UHPOPS

Pre-Optometry Professional Society

UHPOPS

Pre-Optometry Professional Society

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Optometry Related News

Optometry Related News

Optometry Today

We are back at it, scouring the Twitter-verse to see what your patients are tweeting about their experiences.

Our last story was such a hit that we decided to put together another batch of tweets.

This time, we searched for “eye exam” along with the usual “eye doctor” and “optometrist” tags to see what people have been saying. The results had us cracking up in our cubicles, and we hope you like them, too.

So, what are your patients saying and sharing about you on Twitter? Check out our latest collection of tweets from your patients.

(Click the blue link above to see the tweets)

Optometry Today

We are back at it, scouring the Twitter-verse to see what your patients are tweeting about their experiences.

Our last story was such a hit that we decided to put together another batch of tweets.

This time, we searched for “eye exam” along with the usual “eye doctor” and “optometrist” tags to see what people have been saying. The results had us cracking up in our cubicles, and we hope you like them, too.

So, what are your patients saying and sharing about you on Twitter? Check out our latest collection of tweets from your patients.

(Click the blue link above to see the tweets)

OAT Quiz of the Week

If you get a 100 on one of the quizzes for every month, you'll earn member points! Points will be added during the end of the month.

(Updated 04/12/2017)

OAT Quiz of the Week

If you get a 100 on one of the quizzes for every month, you'll earn member points! Points will be added during the end of the month.

(Updated 04/12/2017)

Welcome to your OAT Practice Quiz

1) What is the correct decreasing order of the boiling points of the following compounds?

I. n-hexane
II. 2-methylpentane
III. 2,2-dimethylbutane
IV. n-heptane
2) How many really suffer as a result of labor market problems? This is one of the most critical yet contentious social policy questions. In many ways, our social statistics exaggerate the degree of hardship. Unemployment does not have the same dire consequences today as it did in the 1930's when most of the unemployed were primary bread-winners, when income and earnings were usually much closer to the margin of subsistence, and when there were no countervailing social programs for those failing in the labor market. Increasing affluence, the rise of families with more than one wage earner, the growing predominance of secondary earners among the unemployed, and improved social welfare protection have unquestionably mitigated the consequences of joblessness. Earnings and income data also overstate the dimensions of hard-ship. Among the millions with hourly earnings at or below the minimum wage level, the overwhelming majority are from multiple-earner, relatively affluent families. Most of those counted by the poverty statistics are elderly or handicapped or have family responsibilities which keep them out of the labor force, so the poverty statistics are by no means an accurate indicator of labor market pathologies. Yet there are also many ways our social statistics underestimate the degree of labor-market-related hardship. The unemployment counts exclude the millions of fully employed workers whose wages are so low that their families remain in poverty. Low wages and repeated or prolonged unemployment frequently interact to undermine the capacity for self-support. Since the number experiencing job-lessness at some time during the year is several times the number unemployed in any month, those who suffer s a result of forced idleness can equal or exceed average annual unemployment, even though only a minority of the jobless in any month really suffer. For every person counted in the month unemployment tallies, there is another working part-time because of the inability to find full-time work, or else outside the labor force but wanting a job. Finally, income transfers in our country have always focused on the elderly, disabled, and dependent, neglecting the needs of the working poor, so that the dramatic expansion of cash and in kind transfers does not necessarily mean that those failing in the labor market are adequately protected. As a result of such contradictory evidence, it is uncertain whether those suffering seriously as a result of labor market problems number in the hundreds of thousands or the tens of millions, and hence, whether high levels of joblessness can be tolerated or must be countered by job creation and economic stimulus. There is only one area of agreement in this debate-that the existing poverty, employment, and earnings statistics are inadequate for one of their primary applications, measuring the consequences of labor market problems.


The author states that the mitigating effect of social programs involving income transfers on the income level of low-income people is often not felt by...
3) Assume that a thermometer with 1 mL of mercury is taken from a freezer with a temperature of -25°C and placed near an oven at 225°C. If the coefficient of volume expansion of mercury is 1.8 x 10^-4 K^-1, by how much will the liquid expand?
4) If 19/(5x + 17) = 19/31, then x =...

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Diagnosis of the Week

Diagnosis of the Week

Coloboma

A coloboma describes conditions where normal tissue in or around the eye is missing from birth.

Coloboma comes from the Greek word that means “curtailed.” The eye develops quickly during a fetus’ first three months of growth. A gap, known as the choroidal fissure, appears at the bottom of the stalks that eventually form the eye. This fissure generally closes by the seventh week of pregnancy. If it does not close, a coloboma or space forms.

A coloboma can affect one or both eyes. If both eyes are involved, it can affect them the same way or differently. There are different types of coloboma, depending on the part of the eye affected:

  • Eyelid coloboma. A piece of the upper or lower eyelid is missing.
  • Lens coloboma. A piece of the lens is missing.
  • Macular coloboma. In this coloboma, the macula fails to develop normally.
  • Optic nerve coloboma. In this coloboma, the optic nerve is hollowed out, reducing vision.
  • Uveal coloboma. The uvea is the middle layer of the eye. This coloboma can affect the iris, the colored part of the eye, giving it a distinct keyhole or cat-eye appearance.
  • Chorio-retinal coloboma. In this coloboma, part of the retina is missing.

Coloboma

A coloboma describes conditions where normal tissue in or around the eye is missing from birth.

Coloboma comes from the Greek word that means “curtailed.” The eye develops quickly during a fetus’ first three months of growth. A gap, known as the choroidal fissure, appears at the bottom of the stalks that eventually form the eye. This fissure generally closes by the seventh week of pregnancy. If it does not close, a coloboma or space forms.

A coloboma can affect one or both eyes. If both eyes are involved, it can affect them the same way or differently. There are different types of coloboma, depending on the part of the eye affected:

  • Eyelid coloboma. A piece of the upper or lower eyelid is missing.
  • Lens coloboma. A piece of the lens is missing.
  • Macular coloboma. In this coloboma, the macula fails to develop normally.
  • Optic nerve coloboma. In this coloboma, the optic nerve is hollowed out, reducing vision.
  • Uveal coloboma. The uvea is the middle layer of the eye. This coloboma can affect the iris, the colored part of the eye, giving it a distinct keyhole or cat-eye appearance.
  • Chorio-retinal coloboma. In this coloboma, part of the retina is missing.

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